Lamar County employees make the dream of 130-mile trail a reality

»Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 in Media | Comments Off

Hike-and-bike trails are nothing new for Northeast Texas. Paris, the city with a 75-foot Eiffel Tower topped with a red Stetson, has supported its Trail de Paris for more than a dozen years. The 6.9-mile linear park slices through the county seat of Lamar County like a vein of green gold.

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Walking Outdoor Art Gallery

»Posted by on Apr 21, 2014 in Media | Comments Off

trail cansStudents and members of the PJC Art League have decorated trash cans that are on display at different locations along the trail.

“Each can is an original work,” said PJC art instructor Susan Moore. “The subject matter ranges in scope from deep space and the solar system, to mystical figures, and everything in between such as landscape, patterns, social commentary, and animals. Students used as assortment of media, such as house paint donated by Sherwin Williams to the Friends of the Trail, their own acrylic paint, wallpaper, and magazine scraps. They have also used an assortment of techniques that include air brush, collage, sponge painting, spray painting, straight painting, drip painting, and the use of templates made from tape and twine. Each can is a unique artistic statement, and will be colorful reminders to please keep Paris beautiful and use the trash cans along the Trail de Paris!”

Project participants in are: Baron Capers, Chelsea de la Rosa, Stephanie Eller, Riley Hodnett, Amanda Lair-Barnett, Jenaveve Lester, Mario Munguia (PJC graduate), Anita O’Neal, Alex Ricketts, Montel Thomas, Candra Wyatt, and Susan Moore.

Come out and enjoy the art and the fresh air!

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NETT Quarterly Meeting

»Posted by on Jan 24, 2014 in Upcoming Events | Comments Off

Greetings, Trail Supporters!

The next quarterly meeting of the Northeast Texas Trail (NETT) supporters will be on Saturday, Feb 8, 1-3:30 pm in Farmersville at the Civic Center at 201 Orange Street, Farmersville, (corner of Hill & Orange).

Lunch will be provided at 12:00 PM prior to the meeting—please join us!

The agenda is being finalized and will be sent out within a few days. We have a great meeting planned with some very special speakers. There’s good things happening with NETT and we are eager to share them with you so please plan to attend the meeting on Saturday, February 8th in Farmersville.

Also, plan to bring your bike and riding gear as we plan to have a tour of the Farmersville portion of NETT following the meeting.

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Love the NETT Ride

»Posted by on Dec 12, 2013 in Upcoming Events | Comments Off

lovethenett

Huge LOVE the NETT Fun Team Ride
Sunday, February 16 at 12:00pm
Farmersville, Texas
For more information or to Join CLICK HERE.
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One Heck of a Trek

»Posted by on Dec 5, 2013 in Media | Comments Off

Northeast Texas Trail. Become a part of completing the trail way and building a destination for current and future generations, and a legacy for our children and grandchildren. Successfully completed trail sections have proven they richly enhance the quality of life for everyone – those who actively use the trail, the communities along the trail, and trail visitors. Learn more by clicking the brochure icon below!

oneheckofatrek

 

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Supporters hear update on 130-mile Northeast Texas Trail through Paris

»Posted by on Dec 5, 2013 in Media | Comments Off

TrailsMeeting1Supporters of the Northeast Texas Trail met Friday afternoon at the Love Civic Center to discuss completion of the trail.

Lunch was provided before the meeting by the Lamar County Chamber of Commerce and Friends of the Trail.

Lamar County Judge Chuck Superville opened the meeting, thanking those involved for their support and cooperation. There were several topics of discussion, including updates on the NETT website and the legal background of the group.

Chris Jones, who recently traveled the trail from Farmersville to Ladonia with his family, also gave a presentation of his experiences.

NETT president Earl Erickson explained the purpose of the group before the meeting.

“We’re an advocacy group that supports this trail construction,” he said. “And we work closely with the seven railbanked agencies that have the deeds to the corridor.”

Currently, the trail stretches 130 miles, from Farmersville to New Boston. When completed, it will be the longest hiking, biking and equestrian trail in Texas and the fourth longest in the nation, Erickson said.

“We’ve got almost eight miles developed here in Paris, between Paris and Reno, and we’re extending another five miles through the City of Blossom,” Erickson said.

The trail can be used for non-motorized transportation only, so bicycles are welcome.

The construction is part of the “Rails-to-Trails” project. Due to a federal law known as The National Trails System Act, land for the project is provided at no cost.

Through this act, the land becomes what is known as “rail-banked,” which is when a railroad company voluntarily sells, donates or leases unwanted rail lines and tracks to a qualified public or private entity.

However, according to NETT board member Keith Shelton, the rail-banked corridor is not considered to be abandoned. Before construction of the trail, trail managers sign a document saying they understand that the railroad could re-occupy the space.

“It is ‘in the bank,’ and if the railroad ever needs it back, all they’ve got to do is file to the Service and Transportation Board … to put that corridor back in use, and they get to,” Shelton said.

But fewer than 1 percent of rail-banked corridors are ever converted back to railways, so the likelihood of this trail being reclaimed is unlikely, Shelton added.

As of 2011, more than 16,000 miles of trails were built onto former railroad corridors. This trail is fashioned after the longest “rails-to-trails” project in the country, Erickson said.

“We’re modeling our trail after the KATY trail in Missouri, a rail-banked corridor that was developed by the Missouri Parks and Wildlife Department into a hike, bike, and equestrian trail and has been successfully used for 20 years,” Erickson said.

“It’s 250 miles. It goes from St. Louis through the heartland of Missouri. It follows the Missouri River [and ends] about 50 miles short of Kansas City,” he said.

The benefits of the trail are apparent in the contiguous communities, Erickson noted. Not only are they safe and a great place to exercise, they also enhance the communities economically.

“The longer a trail is, the farther people come to use it; and the longer the time they spend in the area of the trail, the more money they will spend there,” Erickson said. “Tourism and economic development are big, especially for this 130-mile trail.”

Additionally, the trail can promote community improvement for the local citizens.

“We’re tying the trail into the Paris ISD’s Safe Route to School program and the City of Paris’s Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan” Erickson said. “The trail is … a backbone for both projects.”

While the trail is currently undergoing construction, citizens can do their part by getting others involved, Erickson said.

Not only does it encourage and promote a healthy lifestyle, it helps to preserve the Texas wildlife and heritage, he said. Word-of-mouth plays a large role in how many people visit each year, and hopefully, completion of the trail is not too far in the future, he said.

“The goal is to clear and grade where necessary by the end of next year,” he said. “We’ve got several portions of the trail that are already cleared, graded and surfaced like in Paris.”

Information on the project is available at www.traildeparis.org or www.northeasttexastrail.org.

By Courtney McNeal, eParisExtra
Original article can be seen on eParisExtra.com

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The quest to hike the 130-mile Northeast Texas Trail

»Posted by on Dec 5, 2013 in Media | Comments Off

Our 130-mile Northeast Texas Trail from Farmersville to New Boston made the Cover Page and Story of the 2013 November issue of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Magazine. Read the full article on how a hiker sets off to be the first to walk the Northeast Texas Trail.

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